Scavenger Hunt Questions & Answers

Scavenger Hunt Day #1 – Jackie Robinson (1919-1972)

Jackie Robinson (1919-1972) was born in Georgia as the youngest of five children, and in 1947 became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the modern era when he started at First Base for the Brooklyn Dodgers.

The 1930 U.S. Census shows 121 Pepper, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California. This address was listed as “W. Pepper St.” in the 1940 U.S. Census.

References:

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9R41-8G6?i=3

 

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/6224/images/4531815_00252

There are several sources for this information. Edna McGriff was enumerated in the 1930 U.S. Census on the page following Jackie. One hunt participant located her 1933 Death Certificate.

References:

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GR41-83C?i=4

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/6224/images/4531815_00253

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9SF-293F-L

Jack was enumerated in the 1940 U.S. Census as a part-time janitor at motion picture studio. One participant also found him listed as an Assistant Athletic Director with the National Youth Administration (NYA), but this information is harder to confirm.

References:

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89MT-692X?i=2

 

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/2442/images/m-t0627-0024000407

 

Mallie’s occupation is enumerated in the 1920 U.S. Census as “Laborer, General Farm” and in the 1940 U.S. Census as a “Laundress, Private Home.” In the 1930 U.S. Census her occupation was shown as “none” although a book 2007 book by biographer Jonathan Eig indicates she also held odd jobs.

References:

 

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9R66-97P?i=21

 

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9R41-8G6?i=3

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89MT-692X?i=2

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/6061/images/4300116_00022

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/6224/images/4531815_00252

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/2442/images/m-t0627-0024000407

The 121 Pepper Street (Pasadena) home owned by Mallie Robinson was valued at $4,000 in the1930 U.S. Census. In the 1940 U.S. Census, Jackie lived in that same house which was at that time rented by his sister-in-law (so the monthly rent paid was listed in lieu of the value). His mother lived next door at 133 Pepper Street, and her home was valued at $2,000.

References:

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9R41-8G6?i=3

 

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89MT-692X?i=2

 

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/6224/images/4531815_00252

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/2442/images/m-t0627-002400040

It has been widely reported that he was named in honor of (then recently deceased) former President Theodore Roosevelt, however the actual source of this information is difficult to find. One of our participants found this story documented in a 1997 book by biographer Arnold Rampersad.

References:

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/first/r/rampersad-robinson.html

Scavenger Hunt Day #2 – John Jacob Wintler (1837-1913)

John Jacob Wintler (1837-1913) arrived in Clark County from New York via the Panama Isthmus in 1857, became a steamboat engineer, and later operated a harness and saddle shop in Vancouver.

He is known to have had 10 children, six with first wife Lucy Jane (née Knight), and four with second wife Sarah (née Butler). Nine of the children were enumerated together in the 1887 Washington Territorial Census and in the Will which John made in 1911. The tenth child, Lucy K. Wintler, died at seven months of age on Aug. 29, 1877. She does not appear in a census, but is memorialized on the family grave marker located in the Old City Cemetery in Vancouver, Washington. That marker has been photographed andcan be viewed on the findagrave.com website.

References:

1870: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6PQC-L1G?i=75

 

1871: https://digitalarchives.wa.gov/DigitalObject/Download/749485ee-93e9-4c0c-9809-112d9eba14fc

1877: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/35625823/lucy-k.-wintler

 

1880: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYBC-2YK?i=34

 

1883: https://digitalarchives.wa.gov/DigitalObject/Download/6698a76e-307d-401b-a54d-2d8132db2eb5

 

1885: https://digitalarchives.wa.gov/DigitalObject/Download/516baa84-8704-4b72-adf4-6f2a69cea6d9

 

1887: https://digitalarchives.wa.gov/DigitalObject/Download/8c8505d9-76e8-4520-a67c-17868d9bf274

1900: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-D1PD-FX?i=22

 

1911: https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/9086/images/004355352_00228

John’s home address is listed differently in the 1910 U.S. Census, the 1912 City Directory for Vancouver, his published 1913 Obituary, and on his 1913 Death Certificate. For the purposes of this CCGS Scavenger Hunt, all four answers were allowed. For genealogical purposes, it is suggested that Clark County property records be used in order to locate the precise parcel where the home was located.

References:

[Note: These sources do not agree.]

 

1910: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYBC-6Q4

 

1910: https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/7884/images/4454959_00866

1913: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6QXQ-VDX

The land patent reads “the thirtieth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy four” (image found on the General Land Office, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior website).

References:

 

https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/cdi/default.aspx?doc_id=1583514#cdiDetailsTabIndex=1

Lucy was born to Joel and Amelia (née Stewart) Knight at their farm on the south shore of the Des Moines River near Vernon in Van Buren County, Iowa. The family was enumerated there in the 1840 and 1850 U.S. Census. The book Covered Wagon Women, Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails 1853-1854, Volume 6, by Kenneth L. Holmes, 1986 (available on Google Books), gives details about the farm.

References:

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/7667/images/4298893_00111

 

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/7163/images/4268772_00119

 

https://digitalarchives.wa.gov/DigitalObject/Download/9fb9cb9c-1c7c-49f1-a7b5-5221bfc1f648

 

Lucy Jane Knight probably had three memorable days in 1853. The first was on April 1st when their wagon train began its journey west across the plains. The second was on April 29th when they spotted the first Indians and she and her younger sister Almira ran to hide in the wagon. The third, and probably most memorable, was on August 8th when she wandered behind the wagon train and it left her. Emigrants in the next wagon train picked her up and returned her to her family. This information is contained in the journal kept by Lucy’s mother Amelia (née Stewart) Knight. The original journal is held at the University of Washington Library. The book Covered Wagon Women, Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails 1853-1854, Volume 6, by Kenneth L. Holmes, 1986 (available on Google Books) reprints selected journal entries.

References:

SS: https://books.google.com/booksid=xzbiP5M2MAYC&pg=PA36&lpg=PA36&dq=Lucy+Jane+Wintler&source=bl&ots=DbWUCzgJe&sig=ACfU3U1RCTU2iCQaRMOIcLcTDzL5s1Nyg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi40vi8lpTyAhUXIDQIHVMRBT0Q6AEwEHoECBcQAw#v=onepage&q=Lucy%20Jane%20Wintler&f=false

Scavenger Hunt Day #3 - Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885)

Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), the 18th President of the United States. After graduating 21st in the Class of 1843 at West Point, he served at numerous Army postings, one being Fort Vancouver in the Oregon (later Washington) Territory.

This question wasn’t straight forward based on conflicting accounts found on various historical websites. For the purposes of this CCGS Scavenger Hunt, we accepted Lieutenant, Brevet Captain, and Captain. Commission by brevet to a higher rank (which has been obsolete since 1922) was bestowed by the U.S. Army prior to 1865 as a reward for outstanding service. According to the Complete Army Register of theUnited States for 100 Years (1779 to 1879), by Thomas H.S. Hamersley, 1881, page 472, Ulysses S. Grant received these promotions between his West Point graduation and his resignation on July 31, 1854:

  • July 1, 1843: Brevet Second Lieutenant, 4th Infantry
  • Sept. 30, 1845: Second Lieutenant, 7th Infantry
  • Sept. 8, 1847: Brevet First Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct at Molino del Ray
  • Sept. 13 , 1847: Brevet Captain for gallant conduct at Chapultepec
  • Sept. 16, 1847: First Lieutenant
  • Aug. 5, 1853: Captain

Notice that only eight days elapsed between Brevet First Lieutenant, Brevet Captain, and (Full) First Lieutenant. Subsequent to his promotion to the rank of full Captain, Grant was assigned to the command of F Company at Fort Humboldt, California (which, in a letter home to his wife, was scheduled for October). Hence, he would have held the First Lieutenant rank on arrival at Fort Vancouver (Sept. 20, 1852) and the Captain rank at departure.

References:

[Note: He arrived on Sept. 20, 1852 and departed in the Fall of 1853]

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b5497810&view=1up&seq=508

Ulysses and Julia were enumerated twice in the 1850 U.S. Census. On August 10th they, and their three month old son, were living in the 2nd Ward of St. Louis, Missouri. Grant’s first name was misspelled as “Julicious.” On September 9th they, and their (now) four month old son, were living in the 4th Ward of St. Louis,Missouri. Grant’s initial for his first name was misspelled as “Hugh.”

Although the Grants were enumerated in their home at East Galena, Jo Daviess County, Illinois, in the 1880 U.S. Census, this doesn’t appear to be their retirement home. After leaving office on March 4, 1877, the Grants set out for a world tour on May 16th, returning on September 20, 1879. Following his failure in 1880 to gain a 3rd presidential nomination, they decided to settle in New York and bought a house near Central Park in August 1881. They remained there until his friend, James W. Drexel, placed his cottage on Mount McGregor, near Saratoga Springs, at their service. Grant resided there, completing his memoirs from June 16th, 1885, until his death on July 23rd.

References:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433082401286&view=2up&seq=269

Scavenger Hunt Day #4 – Elisha Whittlesey (1783-1863)

Elisha Whittlesey (1783-1863) was a lawyer, civil servant, U.S. Representative from Ohio in the 18th through 25th Congresses, and the General Agent for the Washington National Monument.

Chillicothe was the original capitol when Ohio became a state in 1803. In 1810, the Ohio General Assembly moved the capitol to Zanesville. In 1812 the Ohio General Assembly restored Chillicothe as the temporary capitol city until a permanent site “not more than 40 miles from what may be deemed the common center of the state” could be built. The Ohio General Assembly met for the first time at the new capitol in Columbus in 1816. Hence, in February 1813, Major Whittlesey delivered his verbal dispatches to the Ohio Legislature at Chillicothe. As a footnote, Elisha Whittlesey was elected as a member of the Ohio House of Representatives in 1819.

References:

https://archive.org/details/genealogyofwhitt00whit/page/n151/mode/1up

 

https://www.lsc.ohio.gov/documents/reference/current/guidebook/17/Chapter%2012.pdf

The cornerstone, a 24,500 pound block of pure white Symington marble, was laid at ground level on a base of other stone work. During the strengthening of the foundation in 1879–80 the cornerstone was sandwiched between the bluestone rubble and concrete slab under the old foundation and the concrete buttress completely encircling what remains of the old foundation. The time capsule is today over 20 feet below ground.

References:

http://npshistory.com/publications/wamo/history/chap2.htm

 

http://npshistory.com/publications/wamo/history/chap4.htm

 

https://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_528644

They rented rooms at Mrs. Hyatt’s Boarding House, which was located on the south side of Pennsylvania Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets, in the 4th Ward, Washington City, District of Columbia. That entire block was razed prior to the construction in 1937 of the Apex Building which today houses the Federal Trade Commission.

References:

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XCSC-QHP?i=2

 

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/8054/images/4193081-00430

Scavenger Hunt Day #5 – Dorothy Hooker (circa 1589-circa 1662)

Dorothy (née Hooker) Chester (circa 1589-circa 1662) became part of the colonization of the AmericanColonies in the early 17th century. She was an ancestor of 30th U.S. President Calvin Coolidge.

The date of their marriage was June 1, 1609. Several of the scavenger hunt participants found this in The Great Migration, Vol. II, C-F, but none found images (if they exist on-line) of the Birstall Parish Registers.

References:

https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/imageviewer/collections/2496/images/42521_b158313-

00169

 

https://www.foundersofhartford.org/the-founders/dorothy-hooker-chester

Massachusetts Records, Vol. I, page 180, Sept. 8, 1636, records “Newe Town now called Cambridge.” Massachusetts Records, Vol. I, page 228, May 2, 1638, records “It is ordered that Newtowne shall hence-forward be called Cambridge.”

References:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.li3b8q&view=1up&seq=354

 

https://www.cambridgema.gov/historic/cambridgehistory